Good Health Care starts with good oral care


Did you know a healthier mouth may be important to the health of your body?

Emerging research suggests that gingivitis, when left unchecked, can lead to serious gum disease, which can be associated with stroke, heart disease and diabetes.

Not only does Colgate Total® fight the germs that cause gingivitis, it can contribute to your overall health and help you minimize certain health risks.

When it comes to your mouth health, you’re in charge. So take care of it with the complete protection of Colgate Total®.

Healthy Mouth Routine

Healthy Mouth Routine

Make all three products part of your twice-daily routine:

  1. Brush regularly with Colgate Total® Toothpaste
  2. Rinse with Colgate Total® Mouthwash
  3. Use a Colgate Total® Toothbrush

It’s that easy. You’ll be taking the first steps to a healthier mouth and lifestyle.

Choose a Health Issue or Click on a Body Part to Learn How to Reduce your Risk

Heart Disease Respiratory Disease Smoking Stroke Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis

Diabetes Is Linked to Gum Disease

People with diabetes are 2x more likely to develop serious gum disease. They are at an increased risk because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums.

Learn about the diabetes warning signs >

How You Can Prevent Diabetes

One simple step you can take is to floss at least once a day and brush for two minutes twice a day with a toothpaste specially formulated for gum health, such as Colgate Total®. Colgate Total is the only toothpaste FDA-approved toothpaste to help prevent early gum disease.

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What to Do If You Have Diabetes

There are simple steps you can take to help take charge of your oral health and diabetes:

Get diabetes management expert tips >

Learn how you can manage your diabetes >

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Heart Disease May Be Linked to Severe Gum Disease

Recent research indicates that severe chronic gum disease (periodontitis) is associated with the development of heart (cardiovascular) disease.

Gum disease can cause bacteria to enter the bloodstream where they attach to the fatty deposits in the heart blood vessels. This condition can cause blood clots and may lead to heart attacks.

How You Can Help Prevent Gum Disease

Good oral health is integral to general health, so be sure to brush and floss properly and see your dentist for regular checkups.

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What to Do If You Have a Heart Condition

Be sure to tell your dentist that you have a diagnosed heart condition and what, if any, medications you are taking for it. Your dentist will keep important health information in your record and coordinate treatment with your physician.

Learn more about the importance of discussing heart conditions with your dentist.

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Dental Plaque May Be a Factor in Respiratory Disease

It is believed that bacteria, which can cause respiratory disease, can be found in dental plaque.

Who's at Risk?

Residents of long-term care facilities are often at a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases, such as pneumonia. Poor oral hygiene has been suggested as one possible reason for this development.

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How to Reduce Risk

Previous studies have demonstrated a reduced incidence of respiratory disease development in patients who had daily oral hygiene performed while in long-term care facilities.

One such study examined the levels of respiratory pathogens present in the dental plaque of patients in a long-term care facility. The investigators found that the dental plaque can be a source of respiratory pathogens, and suggest that oral hygiene protocols be instituted to reduce the development of respiratory disease in this population of patients.

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Smoking Is a Risk Factor for Gum Disease

The U.S. Surgeon General* concluded that the scientific evidence was sufficient to infer a casual relationship between tobacco and gum disease. Smoking can also cause or increase the risk of: stained teeth, bad breath, plaque buildup and oral cancer.

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Smoking Is a Strong Risk Factor for Periodontitis

Smoking impairs the blood flow to the periodontal tissues, which prevents the body from mounting an effective immune response to periodontal bacteria, and which also inhibits tissue healing after the periodontitis has been treated.

A study examined the effect of quitting smoking on a group of patients who were to undergo non-surgical treatment of periodontitis. The investigators reported that the patients who had quit smoking had improved healing and improved periodontal pocket probing depths when compared to patients who had not quit smoking.

*2004 study


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Stroke May Be Linked to Periodontitis

The possible relationship of stroke and severe chronic gum disease (periodontitis) has been demonstrated in a number of studies. In one study, subjects with severe chronic gum disease had a risk for the presence of carotid artery plaque deposit level almost four times that of than subjects without periodontal disease.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis May Be Linked to Periodontitis

Periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis are both inflammatory in nature and result in tissue damage and loss. These similarities may provide an association between the two diseases in that periodontitis may influence rheumatoid arthritis and vice versa.

Find the toothpaste that's right for you >

Want the 411 on Proper Oral Care?

Visit our resource center >